First third reviews: nonfiction

Hi gals and pals, I hope all is well! Last year, I wrote mini reviews for all the books I read to push myself to review all the books I read. I then posted those reviews every four months in a bit of a wrap-up. So that's what we're doing today! The first couple months … Continue reading First third reviews: nonfiction

Book review: The Mars Room

The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner From Goodreads It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is … Continue reading Book review: The Mars Room

I actually enjoyed thrillers for once: two reviews

Hello, fellow book lovers! Today I'm reviewing two mystery/thriller books: The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware and The One by John Marrs. Mystery/thriller is a genre I've struggled with in the past. I always find the plots super intriguing, but I find the execution usually lacking. I'm never scared or nervous, and the … Continue reading I actually enjoyed thrillers for once: two reviews

Duology review: Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo Six of Crows synopsis from Goodreads Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich … Continue reading Duology review: Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

Mini review: Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe

Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland by Patrick Radden Keefe From Goodreads In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most … Continue reading Mini review: Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe