Books on my TBR: books about anger

Hey friends! It’s another instalment of books on my TBR! This is a series where I talk about a specific subset of books on my TBR. I’ve done a few posts of really long lists of books on my TBR, so for these posts I’m going to try to keep the list fairly small, provide the synopsis from Goodreads, and talk about where I found it and why I want to read it.

Today, I’m talking about books about anger. This might seem like a weird topic, but I’ve always been interested in female rage and how society views it. It’s something that I’ve personally had struggles with, so I wanted to read more about it to see other perspectives. This post will also be a little shorter than usual because there are only so many of these books lol.


Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower by Brittney Cooper

Far too often, Black women’s anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women’s eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It’s what makes Beyoncé’s girl power anthems resonate so hard. It’s what makes Michelle Obama an icon.

Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don’t have to settle for less. When Cooper learned of her grandmother’s eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Brittney into the fierce feminist she is today. In Brittney Cooper’s world, neither mean girls nor fuckboys ever win. But homegirls emerge as heroes. This book argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one’s own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again.

I love reading books by Black feminists, and this seems like such a great option. For topics like this, I tend to enjoy analyses of pop culture, and this book seems like it examines depictions of Black women’s rage specifically. I also just learned that my library has a copy of this book, so hopefully I can read it soon!


Burn it Down: Women Writing about Anger edited by Lilly Dancyger

Women are angry, and from the #MeToo movement to the record number of women running for political office, they’re finally expressing it. But all rage isn’t created equal. Who gets to be angry? (If there’s now space for cis white women’s anger, what about black women? Trans women?) How do women express their anger? And what will they do with it-individually and collectively?

In Burn It Down, a diverse group of women authors explore their rage-from the personal to the systemic, the unacknowledged to the public. One woman describes her rage at her own body when she becomes ill with no explanation. Another writes of the anger she inherits from her father. One Pakistani American writes, “To openly express my anger would be too American,” and explains why. Broad-ranging and cathartic, Burn It Down is essential reading for any woman who has burned with rage but questioned if she is entitled to express it.

This sounds like a really great, diverse essay collection, examining the anger of different women and how that anger is viewed differently by society. It sounds so interesting, and I’m really excited to read it.


Rage Becomes Her: the Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly

Women are angry, and it isn’t hard to figure out why.

We are underpaid and overworked. Too sensitive, or not sensitive enough. Too dowdy or too made-up. Too big or too thin. Sluts or prudes. We are harassed, told we are asking for it, and asked if it would kill us to smile. Yes, yes it would.

Contrary to the rhetoric of popular “self-help” and an entire lifetime of being told otherwise, our rage is one of the most important resources we have, our sharpest tool against both personal and political oppression. We’ve been told for so long to bottle up our anger, letting it corrode our bodies and minds in ways we don’t even realize. Yet our anger is a vital instrument, our radar for injustice and a catalyst for change. On the flip side, the societal and cultural belittlement of our anger is a cunning way of limiting and controlling our power.

We are so often told to resist our rage or punished for justifiably expressing it, yet how many remarkable achievements in this world would never have gotten off the ground without the kernel of anger that fueled them? Rage Becomes Her makes the case that anger is not what gets in our way, it is our way, sparking a new understanding of one of our core emotions that will give women a liberating sense of why their anger matters and connect them to an entire universe of women no longer interested in making nice at all costs.

I’ve had this book on hold from the library for AGES and keep putting it off or missing my hold. It sounds like a really great introduction to women’s anger and how we can use it productively. Hopefully my hold comes in soon and I can actually read it lol.

So there are some books on my TBR about anger and women’s rage! Have you read any of these? What were your thoughts? Which should I read first? Let me know!

Ally xx


Twitter // Instagram // Goodreads // Buy me a coffee!

2 thoughts on “Books on my TBR: books about anger

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s