Decluttering my Goodreads TBR #6

 

Happy Wednesday, everyone! It has been a hot minute since I did one of these posts, and it seemed like time to do one. So here’s the sixth round of decluttering my Goodreads TBR. Last time was a major failure, so let’s hope this one is better! Read parts one, two, threefour, and five here!

This was started by Lia @ Lost in a Story and is a good way to organize your Goodreads to-read list!

It works like this:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if youre feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m just going to put a disclaimer here before we start: I went to my Goodreads page and started from where I last ended, and the next, like, 20 were classics and older books I want to read. SO I went through and only looked at books I wasn’t sure about because there were a bunch I know I want to read.


The Mysterious Affair at Styles (Hercule Poirot #1) by Agatha Christie

Who poisoned the wealthy Emily Inglethorpe, and how did the murderer penetrate and escape from her locked bedroom? Suspects abound in the quaint village of Styles St. Mary–from the heiress’s fawning new husband to her two stepsons, her volatile housekeeper, and a pretty nurse who works in a hospital dispensary. Making his unforgettable debut, the brilliant Belgian detective Hercule Poirot is on the case. The key to the success of this style of detective novel, writes Elizabeth George in her Introduction, lies in how the author deals with both the clues and the red herrings, and it has to be said that no one bettered Agatha Christie at this game.

Okay so a while ago I wanted to read everything Agatha Christie has written so I added the firsts of all her series. This was has a ton of five- and four-star reviews, so it’s probably well liked. However, am I ever going to read it? Probably not any time soon (and I’m trying to be ruthless).

Verdict: remove


Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See

In nineteenth-century China, in a remote Hunan county, a girl named Lily, at the tender age of seven, is paired with a laotong, “old same,” in an emotional match that will last a lifetime. The laotong, Snow Flower, introduces herself by sending Lily a silk fan on which she’s painted a poem in nu shu, a unique language that Chinese women created in order to communicate in secret, away from the influence of men.

As the years pass, Lily and Snow Flower send messages on fans, compose stories on handkerchiefs, reaching out of isolation to share their hopes, dreams, and accomplishments. Together, they endure the agony of foot-binding, and reflect upon their arranged marriages, shared loneliness, and the joys and tragedies of motherhood. The two find solace, developing a bond that keeps their spirits alive. But when a misunderstanding arises, their deep friendship suddenly threatens to tear apart.

I read one of Lisa See’s books this summer, and loved it. It was seriously amazing. So this is an easy keep.

Verdict: keep


Slide by Jill Hathaway

Vee Bell is certain of one irrefutable truth–her sister’s friend Sophie didn’t kill herself. She was murdered.

Vee knows this because she was there. Everyone believes Vee is narcoleptic, but she doesn’t actually fall asleep during these episodes: When she passes out, she slides into somebody else’s mind and experiences the world through that person’s eyes. She’s slid into her sister as she cheated on a math test, into a teacher sneaking a drink before class. She learned the worst about a supposed “friend” when she slid into her during a school dance. But nothing could have prepared Vee for what happens one October night when she slides into the mind of someone holding a bloody knife, standing over Sophie’s slashed body.

Vee desperately wishes she could share her secret, but who would believe her? It sounds so crazy that she can’t bring herself to tell her best friend, Rollins, let alone the police. Even if she could confide in Rollins, he has been acting distant lately, especially now that she’s been spending more time with Zane.

Enmeshed in a terrifying web of secrets, lies, and danger and with no one to turn to, Vee must find a way to unmask the killer before he or she strikes again.

I’m so torn on this one. It sounds so interesting but it also sounds like something I would’ve enjoyed more 5 years ago (also holy shit, I just realized how old I am). So here’s what I’m going to do: I’m going to make a new Goodreads shelf labelled Read Soon or Remove, which is similar but different to my Top TBR shelf. It’s books that I will either read soon or remove.

Verdict: moved to Read Soon or Remove


The Man in the Brown Suit (Colonel Race #1) by Agatha Christie

Newly-orphaned Anne Beddingfield came to London expecting excitement. She didn’t expect to find it on the platform of Hyde Park Corner tube station. When a fellow passenger pitches onto the rails and is electrocuted, the ‘doctor’ on the scene seems intent on searching the victim rather than examining him . . . 

Armed with a single clue, Anne finds herself struggling to unmask a faceless killer known only as ‘The Colonel’ – while ‘The Colonel’ struggles to eliminate her . . .

Okay I totally intended to remove this, but it sounds so interesting. So it’s staying.

Verdict: keep


Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks

Imaginary friend Budo narrates this heartwarming story of love, loyalty, and the power of the imagination—the perfect read for anyone who has ever had a friend . . . real or otherwise.

Budo is lucky as imaginary friends go. He’s been alive for more than five years, which is positively ancient in the world of imaginary friends. But Budo feels his age, and thinks constantly of the day when eight-year-old Max Delaney will stop believing in him. When that happens, Budo will disappear.

Max is different from other children. Some people say that he has Asperger’s Syndrome, but most just say he’s “on the spectrum.” None of this matters to Budo, who loves Max and is charged with protecting him from the class bully, from awkward situations in the cafeteria, and even in the bathroom stalls. But he can’t protect Max from Mrs. Patterson, the woman who works with Max in the Learning Center and who believes that she alone is qualified to care for this young boy.

Again, this sounds so interesting and has really good reviews. So, I guess it’s staying.

Verdict: keep


Total

Keep: 4
Delete: 1

Total kept: 20
Total deleted: 6

Guys I’m so bad at this!!!! Help me!!!!!


Ally xx

14 thoughts on “Decluttering my Goodreads TBR #6

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