Discussion: books I don’t talk about enough

This post was inspired by the lovely Shanah’s Top 5 Tuesday topic a few weeks ago, which I really enjoyed. I loved reading everybody’s lists and thought it was such an interesting topic. So I thought I’d do my own list, albeit late and not on a Tuesday and way more than five. So really nothing like Top 5 Tuesday, but still. Thank you to Shanah for the idea!


Wither by Lauren DeStefano: This book has a super interesting premise where humans tried to make themselves live longer, succeeded, but then realized that their kids die at 24 for men and 20 for women. So girls are kidnapped off the streets and sold to wealthy families to try and maintain their bloodlines (or whatever). It isn’t the most amazing book, but it’s actually really interesting. I’ve reread it a few times and enjoy it every time. I think I read it in my “YA SUCKS I only read REAL literature” which like is great and all but you were an edgy 17 year old so.

The Undomestic Goddess by Sophie Kinsella: I read this book AGES AGO but it’s so funny. There’s one scene with chickpeas where the main character’s trying to make hummus that I honestly still think about all the time. It’s a classic, I love it.

Stardust by Neil Gaiman: Neil Gaiman is one of my favourite authors and I feel like I don’t talk about him almost at all. Stardust is so interesting and complex and well-written.

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness: I’ve definitely talked about this book, but it isn’t one of my go-to answers. But I LOVE this series and highly recommend it. The writing style is a little different in the first book and Todd’s voice develops with him, so just be aware of that.


Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden: okay I KNOW apparently Arthur Golden is problematic (idk details soz) and this book is a little problematic. BUT I read it in like grade nine before I payed attention to that stuff, and I really enjoyed it. And I reread it a couple of years ago and also really enjoyed it. So maybe if you’re interested, illegally download it?

Legend by Marie Lu: I think this book is a little overlooked, or maybe I just missed the hype. But I really enjoy Day and June and their story. They’re both awesome characters with great development. And the side characters and world-building are pretty decent (especially since Lu apparently wrote this when she was 14 or something). It just never comes to mind for answers, which is a shame.

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini: I read this book in high school for an English class because my teacher was hip and like the challenge the system (me in 60 years tbh). And it’s SO. GOOD. I haven’t read his other books because I loved this one so much and didn’t want to ruin them. But I always forget that I’ve read it until someone brings it up? idk why. But definitely read it!

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt: I reviewed this my first year book blogging and gave it 5/5 stars and still stand by that rating. I love it and think it’s amazing. But again, I never think of it for answers. I think because it’s so damn long, I’m unlikely to reread it any time soon, so it’s never really in my brain. But Tartt has an amazing way with characterizations and setting.


The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman: This whole trilogy was amazing and I totally loved it. I haven’t read it for a while and I think a reread is definitely needed soon. I’ve always wondered why my daemon would be. Thoughts?

Beastly by Alex Flinn: This is a Beauty and the Beast retelling that was made into a horrible movie. Please don’t judge the book by the movie. The movie was shit. Have you seen that tweet about La Croix being like drinking water while someone shouts the name of a fruit? That’s what the movie adaptation feels like. The book is actually so good. The characters are awesome, the scenery and descriptions are great, it’s an interesting story. I reread it when I’m in slumps but I never talk about it!!!!! Why do I do this to books I love???

The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch: I love this book. It’s what originally got me obsessed with synesthesia. It’s such an interesting concept, there’s mystery, there’s an interesting but not annoying writing style, there are illustrations. It’s great and I never think to mention it.

The Spellbook of Listen Taylor by Jaclyn Moriarty: This isn’t a very well-known book, but I really enjoy it. I really connected with Listen Taylor when I first read it, and I think I still do in some aspects. It also has a really interesting premise and there’s some mystery and it’s just great overall. I highly recommend it! This review on Goodreads is amazing and made me want to reread the book, so give the review a read.


Those are some of the books I feel like I don’t talk about enough. What are some of yours?

19 thoughts on “Discussion: books I don’t talk about enough

  1. Glad to hear it inspired you! I’ve been thinking of doing the topic again as there are always books we can talk about!
    Memoirs of a Geisha was sooooo good! I definitely don’t talk about it enough! And I have The Goldfinch on my TBR – everyone raves about it and I can’t wait to read it myself and find out why! Great post 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I had the same experience with Memoirs of a Geisha – I read it when I was 14 and LOVED IT but obviously my 14 year old self wasn’t aware of concepts like fetishizing East Asian culture… so it’s a book I secretly like for the sentimental value that I don’t like to talk about a lot. In case you’re curious: the details of Golden being #problematic are basically that he based MoaG off the life of a woman Mineko Iwasaki who shared a lot of her trade secrets with him under the promise of anonymity, but he broke their agreement and named her as a source. She was also offended that he added a lot of sensationalized details that wouldn’t have been culturally accurate, so she wrote her own memoir ‘Geisha, A Life’ as a response. Basically your average white man can’t stay in his lane kind of thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Fun list, and great idea! I often forget about recommending some of my favorite books, too.

    I read Stardust after watching the movie, so I ended up not liking the book much at all. I sometimes wonder if I would have liked the book more if I read it before watching the movie, but I love the movie too much to think about that for long. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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